‘Publicly Shamed:’ Who Needs The Pillory When We’ve Got Twitter?

Writer Jon Ronson has spent a lot of time tracking people who have been shamed, raked over the coals on social media for mostly minor — but sometimes major — transgressions. And he writes about some of them in his new book, So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed.

Ronson tells NPR’s Steve Inskeep his anxiety level shot up while he was writing about the victims of public ridicule. “My book has a kind of panicky, heart-racing quality to it,” he says, “but in a positive way, because I wanted to say look, if we’re going to carry on destroying people for nothing, this is what it feels like.”

Source: NPR

Friday Video: The Price of Shame

“Public shaming as a blood sport has to stop,” says Monica Lewinsky. In 1998, she says, “I was Patient Zero of losing a personal reputation on a global scale almost instantaneously.” Today, the kind of online public shaming she went through has become constant — and can turn deadly. In a brave talk, she takes a hard look at our online culture of humiliation, and asks for a different way.

 

Google reverses recent “no porn” Blogger decision

Hello everyone,

This week, we announced a change to Blogger’s porn policy. We’ve had a ton of feedback, in particular about the introduction of a retroactive change (some people have had accounts for 10+ years), but also about the negative impact on individuals who post sexually explicit content to express their identities. So rather than implement this change, we’ve decided to step up enforcement around our existing policy prohibiting commercial porn.

Blog owners should continue to mark any blogs containing sexually explicit content as “adult” so that they can be placed behind an “adult content” warning page.

Bloggers whose content is consistent with this and other policies do not need to make any changes to their blogs.

Thank you for your continued feedback.

The Blogger Team

Source: productforums.google.com

Tuesday Tech Tip: How to set up a “legacy contact” in Facebook

Facebook is a place to share and connect with friends and family. For many of us, it’s also a place to remember and honor those we’ve lost. When a person passes away, their account can become a memorial of their life, friendships and experiences.

Today we’re introducing a new feature that lets people choose a legacy contact—a family member or friend who can manage their account when they pass away. Once someone lets us know that a person has passed away, we will memorialize the account and the legacy contact will be able to:

  • Write a post to display at the top of the memorialized Timeline (for example, to announce a memorial service or share a special message)
  • Respond to new friend requests from family members and friends who were not yet connected on Facebook
  • Update the profile picture and cover photo

If someone chooses, they may give their legacy contact permission to download an archive of the photos, posts and profile information they shared on Facebook. Other settings will remain the same as before the account was memorialized. The legacy contact will not be able to log in as the person who passed away or see that person’s private messages.

Alternatively, people can let us know if they’d prefer to have their Facebook account permanently deleted after death.

Here’s how to choose a legacy contact:

  1. Open your settings. Choose Security and then Legacy Contact at the bottom of the page.
  2. After choosing your legacy contact, you’ll have the option to send a message to that person.
  3. You may give your legacy contact permission to download an archive of the posts, photos and profile info you’ve shared on Facebook.

Read the full instructions @ Facebook.