‘Publicly Shamed:’ Who Needs The Pillory When We’ve Got Twitter?

Writer Jon Ronson has spent a lot of time tracking people who have been shamed, raked over the coals on social media for mostly minor — but sometimes major — transgressions. And he writes about some of them in his new book, So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed.

Ronson tells NPR’s Steve Inskeep his anxiety level shot up while he was writing about the victims of public ridicule. “My book has a kind of panicky, heart-racing quality to it,” he says, “but in a positive way, because I wanted to say look, if we’re going to carry on destroying people for nothing, this is what it feels like.”

Source: NPR

Tuesday Tech Tip: Firefox’s Share this page

Just in case you didn’t notice that new paper airplane icon that appeared in Firefox a few weeks ago, it’s their new “Share this page” feature. At first it does nothing, but as you conntect it to your social networking accounts, it will give you the ability to post the pager you’re currently viewing to various social networks such as Facebook, G+, Twitter, delicious, Tumblr, and more. Just click the icon to check it out. If it’s not there, customize your toolbar accordingly.

Firefox Share this page

Fresh Air: How ‘One Nation’ Didn’t Become ‘Under God’ Until The ’50s Religious Revival

The words “under God” in the Pledge of Allegiance and the phrase “In God we trust” on the back of a dollar bill haven’t been there as long as most Americans might think. Those references were inserted in the 1950s during the Eisenhower administration, the same decade that the National Prayer Breakfast was launched, according to writer Kevin Kruse. His new book is One Nation Under God.

In the original Pledge of Allegiance, Francis Bellamy made no mention of God, Kruse says. Bellamy was Christian socialist, a Baptist who believed in the separation of church and state.

“As this new religious revival is sweeping the country and taking on new political tones, the phrase ‘one nation under God’ seizes the national imagination,” Kruse tells Fresh Air‘s Terry Gross. “It starts with a proposal by the Knights of Columbus, the Catholic lay organization, to add the phrase ‘under God’ to the Pledge of Allegiance. Their initial campaign doesn’t go anywhere but once Eisenhower’s own pastor endorses it … it catches fire.”

Kruse’s book investigates how the idea of America as a Christian nation was promoted in the 1930s and ’40s when industrialists and business lobbies, chafing against the government regulations of the New Deal, recruited and funded conservative clergy to preach faith, freedom and free enterprise. He says this conflation of Christianity and capitalism moved to center stage in the ’50s under Eisenhower’s watch.

Source: NPR

Friday Video: The Price of Shame

“Public shaming as a blood sport has to stop,” says Monica Lewinsky. In 1998, she says, “I was Patient Zero of losing a personal reputation on a global scale almost instantaneously.” Today, the kind of online public shaming she went through has become constant — and can turn deadly. In a brave talk, she takes a hard look at our online culture of humiliation, and asks for a different way.