3D print with “glass”

HDglass™ is our new amorphous , high strength and ultra-transparent modified PETG compounded 3D printer filament range. HD stands for “Heavy Duty”, as HDglass™ has excellent properties when it comes to strength, toughness and temperature resistance for same like materials. Next to being heavy duty, HDglass™ has a very impressive transparency as it is an amorphous filament, which lets 90% of the visible light pass through its fibre and has less than 1% haze. With HDglass™ you are now able to get the closest approximate to glass-like results for 3D printed objects.

Printing with HDglass™ filament is very easy and comfortable as it has a great thermal stability, and superb first- and interlayer adhesion and does not produce any odors during 3D printing. HDglass™ is a perfectly save material as it does not contain any hazardous substances, is Bisphenol A free, RoHS certified,  REACH compliant, and is even FDA food and drink contact approved.

Because of its unique transparency and glossiness, the HDglass™ compound allows itself to be coloured in the most beautiful transparent and bright opaque colours. This same superb transparency and glossiness makes HDglass™ a perfect base material for adding thermal-, or  UV light sensitive colour effects.

More @ formfutura.

Should copyright notices be posted next to 3D Printers?

Someone in the California Legislature thinks so…

For a few years now, folks like Michael Weinberg have been pretty vocal about warning the world not to screw up 3D printing by falling for the same copyright/patenting mistakes that are now holding back other creative industries. Trying to lock up good ideas is not a good idea. Just recently we noted how 3D printing was challenging some long held beliefs about copyright, and we shouldn’t simply fall into the old ways of doing things. At our inaugural Copia Institute summit, we had a really fascinating discussion about not letting intellectual property freakouts destroy the potential of 3D printing.

Well, here comes the start of the freakouts. Via Parker Higgins, we find out that there’s a new bill in the California Assembly, AB-37*, which would require libraries that have 3D printers to post stupid signs warning people not to do nasty infringy things with those printers:

This bill would require every public library that provides public access to a 3D printer, as defined, to post a notice on or near the 3D printer that would alert users of the 3D printer of the potential liability of the user for misuse of the 3D printer, as specified. This bill would require the Department of Justice to draft and distribute this notice, as specified, and annually review and revise the notice for accuracy. By imposing additional duties upon local officials, this bill would create a state-mandated local program. 

Read the full article @ TechDirt.

 

My first successful 3D print

Lego mini-fig in carbonite (5)After a whole bunch of tweaking and software changes, along with several failed prints, I finally got the Commission’s Solidoodle 4 to create what I’m declaring it’s first “successful” print. It’s not perfect, and there’s more tweaking to do, but it’s not a total fail. Click the photo for a few more images on Flickr.