• Thing #52: Pinterest

    by  • March 2, 2012 • Learning 2.0 • 0 Comments

    Aviary pinterest-com Picture 1I’ve got a sort of love/meh relationship with Pinterest. I’ve used a lot of different social networks over the years and I can see why this one is so popular. (It’s the first one that my wife discovered before me so that backs up my theory that it’s very popular with “crafty” people; she’s a quilter.) Anyway, I’ve tried to participate and I have pinned some content over the past few months but I just can’t seem to get excited about it.

    However, in a way, I’ve come to the conclusion that it’s a good thing that I just don’t care about Pinterest all that much. Because if I did, I’d then have to think I heck of a lot more about all of the issues the service has raised over the last month. From copyright issues, to legal responsibility issues, to it’s relationship with Flickr; If I cared a lot about Pinterest I’d have to care about these issues and right now I just don’t seem to have the time to do that.

    I’m not going to block you from sharing my flickr photos on Pinterest. Please share away. But I’m not all that sure that I’ll be posting much more, if any, content on the service. Meh.

    About

    Michael Sauers is currently the Technology Innovation Librarian for the Nebraska Library Commission in Lincoln, Nebraska and has been training librarians in technology for more than 15 years. He has also been a public library trustee, a bookstore manager for a library friends group, a reference librarian, serials cataloger, technology consultant, and bookseller. He earned his MLS in 1995 from the University at Albany’s School of Information Science and Policy. Michael’s twelfth book, Google Search Secrets (w/ Christa Burns) was published October 2013 and has two more books on the way. He has also written dozens of articles for various journals and magazines. In his spare time he blogs at travelinlibrarian.info, runs Web sites for authors and historical societies, takes many, many photos, and reads more than 100 books a year.

    http://www.travelinlibrarian.info/

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