More interesting Copyright Statements

In preparation for my upcoming Creative Commons presentation I’ve found myself reading copyright statements in books. I posted an amusing one last week. Here’s a few more which are amusing, but in these cases, are meant to be serious. Italics are emphasis I’ve added.

Justin Charles & Co – 2003
“All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means without the prior written permission of the publisher, nor be otherwise circulated in any form of binding or cover other that that in which it is published and without a similar condition being imposed on the subsequent publisher.”

Borderlands Press – 2007
“This book is fully protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America, and all of the countries covered by the International Copyright Union (including the countries covered by the International Copyright Union including the Dominion of Canada and the rest of the British Commonwealth), and all of the countries covered by the Pan-American Copyright Convention and the Universal Copyright Convention, and of all countries with which the United States has reciprocal copyright relations. All rights, including professional, amateur, motion picture, recitation, lecturing, public reading, radio broadcasting, television video or sound taping, all other forms of mechanical electronic reproductions such as information storage and retrieval systems and photocopying, and the rights of translation into foreign languages are strictly reserved.” [All that in just two sentences.]

February 2008 – Cemetery Dance
“All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the author, or his agent, except by a reviewer who may quote brief passages in a critical article or review to be printed in a magazine or newspaper, or electronically transmitted on radio or television.”
[According to this quoting in a review on Amazon.com or your blog isn’t allowed.]

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