Category: Management

January 5th, 2018 by Michael Sauers

We live in a world of great and increasing complexity, where even the most expert professionals struggle to master the tasks they face. Longer training, more advanced technologies: neither seems to prevent grievous errors. There is a remedy in the most humble and simple of all techniques: the checklist. We can identify successful people in many fields who turn to checklists to pull off some of the most difficult tasks, and places where the impact of the checklist is huge: -in the complex world of surgery, a simple ninety second checklist has cut the rate of fatalities by a third -a cleanliness checklist in intensive care units that has virtually eliminated a type of deadly hospital infection -a restaurant where checklists allow a kitchen and dining room to run like a finely tuned symphony Aside from the great successes there is an inevitable resistance to accepting the discipline of a checklist-a tension between the autonomy experts want and the sense of discipline success actually requires.

Originally published on Aug 17, 2016by Microsoft Research

Image: Wikipedia

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January 5th, 2018 by Michael Sauers

From Amazon.com:

The New York Times bestselling author of Better and Complications reveals the surprising power of the ordinary checklist

We live in a world of great and increasing complexity, where even the most expert professionals struggle to master the tasks they face. Longer training, ever more advanced technologies―neither seems to prevent grievous errors. But in a hopeful turn, acclaimed surgeon and writer Atul Gawande finds a remedy in the humblest and simplest of techniques: the checklist. First introduced decades ago by the U.S. Air Force, checklists have enabled pilots to fly aircraft of mind-boggling sophistication. Now innovative checklists are being adopted in hospitals around the world, helping doctors and nurses respond to everything from flu epidemics to avalanches. Even in the immensely complex world of surgery, a simple ninety-second variant has cut the rate of fatalities by more than a third.

In riveting stories, Gawande takes us from Austria, where an emergency checklist saved a drowning victim who had spent half an hour underwater, to Michigan, where a cleanliness checklist in intensive care units virtually eliminated a type of deadly hospital infection. He explains how checklists actually work to prompt striking and immediate improvements. And he follows the checklist revolution into fields well beyond medicine, from disaster response to investment banking, skyscraper construction, and businesses of all kinds.

An intellectual adventure in which lives are lost and saved and one simple idea makes a tremendous difference, The Checklist Manifesto is essential reading for anyone working to get things right.

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December 29th, 2017 by Michael Sauers

Millennials should not expect their workplace to cater to an individual’s unique skills, but workplace managers should also recognize that millennials do have initiative and other extraordinary talents, if managers just take time to show them the ropes.

Lauren Hoebee aspires to become part of the Dallas Top 40 Executives under 40. Through seeking out an administrative internship, supervising two hospital departments, networking, and working on completing a dual MBA/MHSM degree, her next step is to land an associate administrative job to be eligible to apply for the HCA COO Fast Track Program. Ms. Hoebee has been extremely involved in the Denton, Texas community working with small businesses through Enactus, teaching group exercise classes at various gyms, and volunteering through school programs. Her passion is to help empower young adults to pursue a healthy and fulfilling life.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

Originally Published on Jun 28, 2016

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December 23rd, 2017 by Michael Sauers

Leaders are advised to relinquish control in favor of empowering staff. Giving up that control can be hard for some, especially when they are apt to micromanage workers. The key is to recognize it and then work on behavior change.

When librarians get together to talk about their organizations and how they are managed, the discussion often turns to the plague of the micromanaging supervisor. Library workers all too willingly express their disdain for leaders who constantly meddle in their work, telling them how to do their job and showing little respect for their talent. This behavior, in addition to insulting workers, undermines their commitment to the organization and likely lowers their confidence levels. It’s little coincidence that micromanaging bosses lack the basic self-awareness to know the damage they’re doing to staff morale, because they are often completely unaware of their own micromanaging behavior. The good news is that it may be possible for the habitual micromanager to do something about it, but recognizing it must the first step to change.

Read the whole article @ Library Journal.

Posted in Management

December 22nd, 2017 by Michael Sauers

Most efforts to improve individual and organizational learning focus on teaching people how to give feedback. After years of consulting with organizations around the world on how to manage their most challenging conversations, Heen and her colleagues realized they may have been thinking about the problem the wrong way. She explains why, if you want to improve learning in your organization, the smart money is on figuring out how to receive feedback—even off-base or poorly delivered feedback—and use it to fuel growth.

With plenty of examples and a natural charm, Heen delivers a talk that will change the way you think about feedback. Most of us have a love-hate relationship with feedback, but Heen thinks we can learn to embrace it for the valuable tool it is. If we handle it right, we can use it to enhance our performance and strengthen our most important relationships.

A founder of Triad Consulting Group and a lecturer at Harvard Law School, Heen has spent the last 20 years with the Harvard Negotiation Project, developing negotiation theory and practice. Her work takes her throughout the world, helping people and organizations work through their most difficult conversations.

A New York Times bestselling author of two books, she specializes in particularly difficult negotiations – where emotions run high and relationships become strained. An expert often sought out by the media, Sheila is schooled in negotiation daily by her three children. Learn more about Sheila Heen at http://bit.ly/1IQ0azH.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

Originally published on Jun 22, 2015

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November 24th, 2017 by Michael Sauers

Google Ventures Startup Lab | GV partner Rick Klau covers the value of setting objectives and key results (OKRs) and how this has been done at Google since 1999. Understand the key attributes of effective OKRs and how to apply them in your own organization.

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October 29th, 2017 by Michael Sauers

“As the researchers studied the groups, however, they noticed two behaviors that all the good teams generally shared. First, on the good teams, members spoke in roughly the same proportion, a phenomenon the researchers referred to as ‘‘equality in distribution of conversational turn-taking.’’ On some teams, everyone spoke during each task; on others, leadership shifted among teammates from assignment to assignment. But in each case, by the end of the day, everyone had spoken roughly the same amount. ‘‘As long as everyone got a chance to talk, the team did well,’’ Woolley said. ‘‘But if only one person or a small group spoke all the time, the collective intelligence declined.’’

“Second, the good teams all had high ‘‘average social sensitivity’’ — a fancy way of saying they were skilled at intuiting how others felt based on their tone of voice, their expressions and other nonverbal cues. One of the easiest ways to gauge social sensitivity is to show someone photos of people’s eyes and ask him or her to describe what the people are thinking or feeling — an exam known as the Reading the Mind in the Eyes test. People on the more successful teams in Woolley’s experiment scored above average on the Reading the Mind in the Eyes test. They seemed to know when someone was feeling upset or left out. People on the ineffective teams, in contrast, scored below average. They seemed, as a group, to have less sensitivity toward their colleagues.”

Read the full article @ The New York Times.

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October 27th, 2017 by Michael Sauers

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October 6th, 2017 by Michael Sauers

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September 15th, 2017 by Michael Sauers

This short video from @ScottWilliams provides 10 clear distinctives to help understand the difference between a manager and a leader.

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