The Travelin' Librarian 1,ebooks,Politics & Law Five reasons to remove the DRM from the books you’ve “bought”

Five reasons to remove the DRM from the books you’ve “bought”

The iPad is iBad for freedomThis week, ebook lovers got yet another reminder of why DRM (Digital Rights Management) is terrible for ebooks. While attending a library conference in Singapore, Jim O’Donnell lost access to the titles in his Google Play Books app. Apparently, the app detected that he was in a country where Google Books aren’t available and subsequently denied him access to his books. Stories like this crop up every now and then, each time highlighting some crazy ebook restriction or policy that most people aren’t even aware of. The way things are set up, you kind of need to protect the digital books you buy from the companies that sell them. There are a growing number of ways and reasons why Amazon, Google, or a book publisher might strip you of your digital library.

The best way to protect yourself is to break the DRM on your ebooks for the purpose of keeping a local, personal backup. (We don’t encourage you to do this for any other reason.) The process is not difficult, even if you aren’t very techie. And it allows you to read your ebooks on any device since the software can also convert file types. Keep in mind that this is technically against the Amazon Kindle terms of service, and other ebook sellers like Barnes & Noble, Sony, Kobo, and Google certainly frown on such actions. However, here are five really good reasons to do it, anyway.

1: Leave the country, lose your ebooks

Read the full list, none of which I can disagree with, at Digital Trends.com

Tags:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.